Tuesday, March 14, 2006

iraq and iran

Iraq

Plans for Vietnamization I mean Iraqification are under way. Instead of body counts, de facto President Bush gives numbers on the square miles of Iraq "controlled" by the so-called Iraqi government. Pretty meaningless given no Iraqi military unit can even cook its own meals without US support.

Bush finished his speech waving a letter from the mother of a soldier who was killed, asking that the job be finished so her son won't have died in vain. How about a promise to troops STILL alive not to be killed in vain? "We will finish what we started in Iraq."? Would that be the dissolution of the country into three quarreling states, and the rule of sympathetic-to-Iran theocrats in Baghdad?

A few quotes, with some unsaid details added:

"We have a comprehensive strategy for victory in Iraq." (But we can't tell you what it is, because it is too embarrassing and relies on alien intervention and other deus ex machinas.)
"Iraqi security forces turned in a strong performance." (In a volleyball match against US Marines.)
"This is real progress." (Fewer than 100 people were killed yesterday, woohoo.)
"The terrorists are losing on the field of battle." (Every time a suicide bomber strikes, at least one terrorist dies.)

Iran

Meanwhile, next door in Iran, human rights activists and others are worried that the big idea being hatched by Bush and his Secretary of State Condi Rice for destabilizing the Iranian regime might result in a harsh crackdown on pro-reform, pro-democracy elements in Iran. A couple of Iranians were just arrested for attending a human rights conference. A quote from Iranian human rights activist Emad Baghi: "We are under pressure here both from hard-liners in the judiciary and that stupid George Bush. When he says he wants to promote democracy in Iran, he gives money to these outside groups and we're in here suffering."

Maybe one day the Bushies will learn one fairly basic fact: that overt American interference in the internal affairs of other countries will not necessarily be met with glee and joy by the people of that country.