Friday, December 23, 2005

santorum disavowal of religious legal group surely not connected to his iffy reelection campaign

This just in -- holier-than-thou-and-me godboy Rick Santorum (Republican, The Vatican I mean Pennsylvania) is shocked, shocked to learn that religion might just have been the REAL motivating factor for the (former) Dover, PA schoolboard in mandating that intelligent design be taught alongside evolution. And so Santorum cut off his ties to the Thomas More Law Center, the "sword and shield for people of faith."

Maybe Santorum's Democratic opponent Robert Casey Jr, whose campaign called him "Election-year Rick," was too quick to judge. Maybe Santorum really did just want the kids to get all the theories. No doubt he also pushes the flat-earth theory for geography classes, insists on Marxism being taught in civics classes, and wants to cover both the "tastes great" and "less filling" benefits of certain light beers because he wants to make sure the students are exposed to all sides of the issues. What a great guy.

Lest we forget, in 2002 Santorum said in a Washington Times op-ed article that intelligent design "is a legitimate scientific theory that should be taught in science classes." NOW he says he just meant teachers should be allowed to teach intelligent design if they want to, not that they must be required to do so.

Gosh, it's so tough when you misquote yourself.

Splitting hairs further: Santorum said he disagrees with the Dover school board's policy of requiring the teaching of intelligent design, rather than just teaching the controversy surrounding evolution. He said the case provides "a bad set of facts" for a test on whether theories other than evolution should be taught in science class.

Yep -- the trouble for the holy rollers out there that want to force kids to learn a specific set of religious beliefs in our schools is that Republican Judge Jones' 139-page ruling is full of logic and analysis that very nicely summarizes the case:
Evolution IS a valid scientific concept that is widely accepted;
A few gaps in the evolutionary record does NOT automatically mean that the entire theory is invalid nor that creationism or creation science or intelligent design are therefore right;
Despite the perjury committed by some of the (now former) members of the school board, the real impetus behind their decision was religious, not scientific or educational;
Intelligent design simply fails to meet the definition of a scientific concept or theory and "is not supported by any peer-reviewed research, data or publications."
Damn right, Rick, it is "a bad set of facts" for intelligent design -- it shreds the validity of the whole stupid concept. Very bad, indeed, for ignorant theocrats who want to push their beliefs down our collective throats.